26 6 / 2012

One of the three magazines being launched at this party is Open City, a veritable love letter to New York City’s Chinatowns, for which I have begun to do some blogging on the side. Please come to the party! We can say “hi” and enjoy the many entertainments of the smart, funny Asian Americans on the lineup, including DJ sounds by my good friend James Yeh.

Permalink 5 notes

25 6 / 2012

Our second accidental Tibetan hipster. Be still my stolen heart.
Ben from Australia took this photo and recalls the following: “I ran across this kid when I stayed a night in a tent village of Tibetans 50km or so outside of Litang in China’s Sichuan Province. Despite the horse and yak poo covering the ground, this kid still managed to have style, parading around in his slick suit.”

Our second accidental Tibetan hipster. Be still my stolen heart.

Ben from Australia took this photo and recalls the following: “I ran across this kid when I stayed a night in a tent village of Tibetans 50km or so outside of Litang in China’s Sichuan Province. Despite the horse and yak poo covering the ground, this kid still managed to have style, parading around in his slick suit.”

Permalink 83 notes

17 6 / 2012


"When I was little, I thought my parents looked super dorky in their aviators. Recently, when I went through their old pictures, I realized that my dad looked like he could just be one of my friends, picture taken with my hipstamatic iphone app (or instagram), holding his child.”

- Nancy Lao, who was crying at the time because her dad was dropping her off for a few hours with the g-parents at their home in Wuhan, China. She recalls that his trick to get her to stop involved throwing a toy car over the fence on his way out, a kind of shock and confuse tactic.
Happy Father’s Day, everyone!

"When I was little, I thought my parents looked super dorky in their aviators. Recently, when I went through their old pictures, I realized that my dad looked like he could just be one of my friends, picture taken with my hipstamatic iphone app (or instagram), holding his child.”

- Nancy Lao, who was crying at the time because her dad was dropping her off for a few hours with the g-parents at their home in Wuhan, China. She recalls that his trick to get her to stop involved throwing a toy car over the fence on his way out, a kind of shock and confuse tactic.


Happy Father’s Day, everyone!

Permalink 185 notes

14 6 / 2012

Accidental Chinese Hipsters recommended reading, seen first on one of my favorite blogs: Asians Not Studying.

asiansnotstudying:

This is great! And a whole lot of fun!

And so we talked, immigrant son to immigrant son, food-lover to food-lover, Chinaman to Chinaman. (It isn’t the preferred nomenclature, but it works for us.) We had an honest debate over whether it’s right for chefs to “take” someone else’s culture and sell it, what responsibilities writers and chefs have to make sure people understand where cuisines come from, and, in the end, what it means to be an immigrant in America. What follows is an edited transcript of our conversation. It’s long and there is some tough talk in there, but we felt it was worth sharing.

Permalink 191 notes

13 6 / 2012

In a small town between Quanzhou and Xiamen, Fujian Province a man becomes his own mobile vintage resale shop. The hands-free cigarette is the crowning sign of his expert Chinese entrepreneurship.
Photo by Zoe Elizabeth Noyes.

In a small town between Quanzhou and Xiamen, Fujian Province a man becomes his own mobile vintage resale shop. The hands-free cigarette is the crowning sign of his expert Chinese entrepreneurship.

Photo by Zoe Elizabeth Noyes.

Permalink 77 notes

08 6 / 2012

Dear Readers,
I negligently allowed my one year anniversary with you go by without a special post. On May 10th, 2011, I started Accidental Chinese Hipsters, and have since received pictures from and corresponded with amazing and diverse people from all over the world. Lesson learned: Chinese culture is everywhere. Except for maybe in the Middle East, Africa and Antarctica (I eagerly await emails to the contrary). Finding this community has been a great blessing for me, and I look forward to the wonderful and surprising things that this forum will produce in the future.
And so, for your entertainment and my humiliation, here is a picture of me at the Ocean Park theme park in Hong Kong. Every awkward detail is totally authentic 10-year-old half Chinese kid garb. High waisted jean shorts because those were still normal at the time. Un-ironic Taos shirt given to me by my mother, some of my first cool, grown-up clothes. A necklace with a replica of an old Chinese coin on it that my grandmother bought for me from an illegal street vendor, who, as they were interrupted by an approaching policeman mid haggle, secreted his wares inside the cardboard box that served as his merch table. Following the example of my always prim and dignified grandmother, I acted as if nothing was happening between us an the incredibly tan man with the shabby box. Just having a nice conversation here, Officer. I think my grandmother was also trying to fix up my tomboy hair with that barrette. Last but not least, the oversized glasses were my first pair, chosen by me for their close resemblance to my dad’s glasses. They fell off my face a lot in gym class.
Behind me is a replica of an old style Chinese bedroom. The park also had terrifying carnival rides that my dad convinced me to go on while he stood on the ground eating candy. It was a special trip: the first time that my dad went to Hong Kong to visit relatives with just me as his companion.
Thanks to my mom, Ruth Kuo, for sending me this and several other photos from what she esteems to be my most proto-hipster phase.

Dear Readers,

I negligently allowed my one year anniversary with you go by without a special post. On May 10th, 2011, I started Accidental Chinese Hipsters, and have since received pictures from and corresponded with amazing and diverse people from all over the world. Lesson learned: Chinese culture is everywhere. Except for maybe in the Middle East, Africa and Antarctica (I eagerly await emails to the contrary). Finding this community has been a great blessing for me, and I look forward to the wonderful and surprising things that this forum will produce in the future.

And so, for your entertainment and my humiliation, here is a picture of me at the Ocean Park theme park in Hong Kong. Every awkward detail is totally authentic 10-year-old half Chinese kid garb. High waisted jean shorts because those were still normal at the time. Un-ironic Taos shirt given to me by my mother, some of my first cool, grown-up clothes. A necklace with a replica of an old Chinese coin on it that my grandmother bought for me from an illegal street vendor, who, as they were interrupted by an approaching policeman mid haggle, secreted his wares inside the cardboard box that served as his merch table. Following the example of my always prim and dignified grandmother, I acted as if nothing was happening between us an the incredibly tan man with the shabby box. Just having a nice conversation here, Officer. I think my grandmother was also trying to fix up my tomboy hair with that barrette. Last but not least, the oversized glasses were my first pair, chosen by me for their close resemblance to my dad’s glasses. They fell off my face a lot in gym class.

Behind me is a replica of an old style Chinese bedroom. The park also had terrifying carnival rides that my dad convinced me to go on while he stood on the ground eating candy. It was a special trip: the first time that my dad went to Hong Kong to visit relatives with just me as his companion.

Thanks to my mom, Ruth Kuo, for sending me this and several other photos from what she esteems to be my most proto-hipster phase.

Permalink 91 notes

29 5 / 2012

It is all of a sudden so hot that I can’t blog from my own (un-a-conned) home. Today’s ACH comes to you from a damn cafe. I’m listening to Jackie Mittoo’s rendition of Summer Breeze on repeat and wishing I was in the place that lives inside this man’s getup. I would also accept being in the place where he is standing, in front of the Merlion monument in Singapore. I would furthermore be content to be a merlion, that’s a half lion/half fish, if that meant that I could be swimming in water right now.
Thanks to James from New Zealand who sent this in. 
Now go get that tattooed on your calves, Brooklyn, why don’t you.

It is all of a sudden so hot that I can’t blog from my own (un-a-conned) home. Today’s ACH comes to you from a damn cafe. I’m listening to Jackie Mittoo’s rendition of Summer Breeze on repeat and wishing I was in the place that lives inside this man’s getup. I would also accept being in the place where he is standing, in front of the Merlion monument in Singapore. I would furthermore be content to be a merlion, that’s a half lion/half fish, if that meant that I could be swimming in water right now.

Thanks to James from New Zealand who sent this in.

Now go get that tattooed on your calves, Brooklyn, why don’t you.

Permalink 150 notes

23 5 / 2012

Someone please put this man on the cover of W magazine immediately. It’s as if Megan Draper did a Freaky Friday body switch with a greasy Chinese parking lot attendant and decided not to lower her dressing standards. It’s like Margaret Cho’s impression of Kim Jong-il came to life and ran away. It’s… can I have that jacket?The man is, in fact, the security guard at Christie Miller's apartment complex in Xujiahui, Shanghai, and she claims that his “Gucci clutch” and “Zack Morris cell phone” make her feel “so safe.” Her brother, Kalifa Dong, took this photo. I hope that it is the first of many.

Someone please put this man on the cover of W magazine immediately. It’s as if Megan Draper did a Freaky Friday body switch with a greasy Chinese parking lot attendant and decided not to lower her dressing standards. It’s like Margaret Cho’s impression of Kim Jong-il came to life and ran away. It’s… can I have that jacket?
The man is, in fact, the security guard at Christie Miller's apartment complex in Xujiahui, Shanghai, and she claims that his “Gucci clutch” and “Zack Morris cell phone” make her feel “so safe.” Her brother, Kalifa Dong, took this photo. I hope that it is the first of many.

Permalink 247 notes

13 5 / 2012

Hey, now I want to dress up like the kid from the Tin Drum too. Riffing off a child icon has got to be a great style trick. Not necessarily a character meant to entertain children, just thinking about hordes of crop-topped, mature-bodied Pippi Longstockings is stomach churning, but one that has that off kilter, tiny adult appeal. Such as thus.Taken near Broadway, Sydney, Australia by Ania.

Hey, now I want to dress up like the kid from the Tin Drum too. Riffing off a child icon has got to be a great style trick. Not necessarily a character meant to entertain children, just thinking about hordes of crop-topped, mature-bodied Pippi Longstockings is stomach churning, but one that has that off kilter, tiny adult appeal. Such as thus.

Taken near Broadway, Sydney, Australia by Ania.

Permalink 225 notes

09 5 / 2012

It’s been a rough week. Don’t worry! You can take a little “me” break.
Spotted by Danielle at the VanDusen Botanical Garden (Vancouver BC).

It’s been a rough week. Don’t worry! You can take a little “me” break.

Spotted by Danielle at the VanDusen Botanical Garden (Vancouver BC).

Permalink 88 notes